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Latest scams

We're working all the time to better safeguard your financial and personal information.
To help better protect you against scams, this page will provide information on some of the scams around at the moment.
 

More information on scams:


Scam emails

September 2019

Email Subject Line: Dear Westpac Bank client (NAME) We have restricted access to your account

This email advises that there is irregular activity on your accounts, therefore it is now restricted. The link will take you to a phishing website which may ask for personal information such as online banking log in details &/or credit card details.

Do not click the link in this email or enter your personal information. Westpac will never ask you to click a link to sign into your online banking.

 

Scam email - Westpac - Dear Westpac Bank Client - SEPT 2019

 

August 2019

Email Subject Line: Westpac bank activation

The email advises your Westpac Online Banking account requires activation. The link will take you to a phishing website which may ask for personal information such as online banking log in details &/or credit card details.

Do not click the link in this email or enter your personal information. Westpac will never ask you to click a link to sign into your online banking.

 

scam email

 

Email Subject Line: Westpac Alert!

The email advises there was an attempt to sign in to your account from an unrecognized device The link will take you to a phishing website which may ask for personal information such as online banking log in details &/or credit card details.

Do not click the link in this email or enter your personal information. Westpac will never ask you to click a link to sign into your online banking.

 

scam email

 

May 2019

Email Subject Line: Notification: Suspicious login access on Westpac has been detected OR Your recent login on Westpac has triggered our security system

This email advises that there is suspicious activity from a device. The link will take you to a phishing website which may ask for personal information such as online banking log in details &/or credit card details.

Do not click the link in this email or enter your personal information. Westpac will never ask you to click a link to sign into your online banking.

 

scam email

 

April 2019

Email Subject Line: Notification: Your westpac banking services has been stopped on April 2019

This emails advises your card is locked. The link will take you to a phishing website which may ask for personal information such as online banking log in details &/or credit card details.

Do not click the link in this email or enter your personal information. Westpac will never ask you to click a link to sign into your online banking.

 

scam email

 

January 2019

Email Subject Line: Westpac "Important Information on how to complete your recent transaction"

This emails advises you have a payment in a pending status on our database and requires an account to credit courier/agent/transaction fees.

It is important to note Westpac will not act as a third party between a merchant and customer.

 

scam email

 

Email Subject Line: About your account-086152

This emails advises your account is temporarily locked from online banking due to unsuccessful login attempts. The link will take you to a phishing website which may ask for personal information such as online banking log in details &/or credit card details.

Do not click the link in this email or enter your personal information. Westpac will never ask you to click a link to restore your online banking access.

 

ASIC scam email

 

September 2018

Email Subject Line: Renewal

By clicking the link "Renewal Letter" in this scam email there is a strong possibility your computer will become infected with malicious software, which will compromise your online activities, including your banking.

Do not click the link in this email or enter the information requested. If you have clicked any links within this email we strongly recommend you install Trusteer Rapport to your device, go to westpac.com.au/trusteer.
 

ASIC scam email

 

July 2018

Email Subject Line: Important Information

Description:

This emails advise you have been disabled from online banking due to unsuccessful login attempts. The link will take you to a phishing website which may ask for personal information such as online banking log in details.

Do not click the link in this email or enter your personal information. Westpac will never ask you to click a link to restore your online banking access.

Important Information

June 2018

Email Subject Line: ATO EMAIL ID: XXXXXXXXXXXX

Description: This email advises you that you are entitled to a refund from the ATO. By clicking this link, it is likely you will be taken to a phishing website which may ask for personal information such as online banking log in details.

Do not click the link in this email or enter the information requested.

 

ATO EMAIL ID: XXXXXXXXXXXX

 

Email Subject Line: Payment to a new payee ID: XXXXXX

Description: This email replicates a new payee styled email, encouraging you to click the cancel transaction link. By clicking this link, it is likely you will be taken to a phishing website which may ask for personal information such as online banking log in details.

Do not click the link in this email or enter the information requested. Westpac will never ask you for this type of information via email.

 

Payment to a new payee ID: XXXXXX

 

March 2018

Email Subject Line: Your Origin Energy Invoice

Description: This email contains an attachment (pictured) posing as an Origin Energy invoice. Do not open the attachment. If you open it and then enable editing when prompted, there is a strong possibility your computer will become infected with malicious software. This will compromise your online activities, including your banking.

Be cautious when receiving emails that contain attachments, and do not enable editing. If you have clicked any links within this email we strongly recommend you install Trusteer Rapport, go to westpac.com.au/trusteer.

 

Scam Origin Energy bill with malicious software

Phone scams alert

Fraudsters don't only strike online. There's been an increase in phone scams where the caller claims to be from a reputable organisation offering to assist with a computer issue.

They then attempt to take control of, or access your computer.

Do not allow this under any circumstances; just hang up.

Also, be particularly vigilant if you’re asked to disclose any Online Banking sign-in details or Westpac Protect™ SMS Code sent to your mobile. Again, just don’t do it.

 

 

Remote access phone scam example

Phil uses the internet for everyday purposes - emails, receiving and paying bills and keeping in touch with his grandkids via social media.

One morning Phil receives a phone call from a caller from a utility provider. The caller advises Phil that they have identified a fraudster and they need his assistance catching them. Eager to help, Phil follows the caller’s instructions to install some software on his PC.  The caller asks Phil to activate the software so that they can track the fraudster, and tells him that he will soon receive some money deposited into his cheque account.

He signs into his online banking and confirms his account balance.  The caller then tells him to stay on the phone as they have almost caught the fraudster, and asks whether he has received a deposit into his account yet.  Phil checks his online banking and  tells the caller that his account balance is indeed higher.  The caller then tells Phil he needs to return the deposited funds back to the utility provider, and he should withdraw the deposit as cash at his nearest branch, and repay the utility provider via a money transfer agent.

Phil is waiting for a teller at his local branch when he gets a call from Westpac about some unusual online banking activity. Phil is unsure what to do as the caller told him not to talk to anyone, not even his bank, about this transaction but when the banker starts to explain some of his recent transactions, he starts to feel uneasy about the caller’s request to withdraw cash from his account.

Unbeknownst to Phil, this morning’s caller was not ringing on behalf of a utility provider, but was a fraudster that had gained access to Phil’s PC and transferred funds from Phil’s credit card to his cheque account, claiming this transaction was the deposit owed to the utility provider. The software Phil had installed on his PC was ‘remote access software’ that had allowed the caller to access his personal information, and take control of his PC. The fraudster was able to watch every move Phil made on his PC, including the time he was signed into his online banking.

Phil is lucky that Westpac called when they did, and the local tellers were able to assist in reversing the transaction back to his credit card; however he could have been out of pocket as the Westpac Security Guarantee may not have applied if Phil had withdrawn the deposit as cash from his account.

 

Scammers will try anything to convince you of their story. Below is an example of a scam email received by a customer, in an attempt by the scammers to prove they are legitimate.

 

Protect your SMS code like you would a password or PIN

Disclosing your Westpac Protect SMS code - or any Westpac Online Banking access codes - to others contravenes our Terms and Conditions. Doing so may find you liable for any losses due to fraud on your account.


Other recent phone scams involve hoax callers claiming to be bank employees, who then request customer account or personal details. For better protection from phone scams:

  • Keep all access codes (e.g. ATM password, card PIN, Online Banking password, Westpac Protect™ SMS Code we send to your mobile) secret and secure. We’ll never ask for this information over the phone or on email.
  • If you're unsure, ask for a reference number and call back on a trusted number (i.e. phone book) to confirm if the call was genuine
  • Never give a stranger remote access to your computer
  • Do not give out your personal, account or online details unless the phone number comes from a trusted source
  • Keep your computer protected by running and updating security software purchased from trusted sources
  • If you think you've fallen for the scam, contact us immediately on 132 032.

SMS scams

October 2019

Description: This SMS advises a potential issue has been detected and to click a link to confirm your device. By clicking the link you will be taken to a fake sign in page (phishing website) which requests your personal banking information.

Westpac will never ask you for this type information via sms. Please delete this message.

 

August 2019

Description: This phishing SMS has been sent using a sender name of "Westpac" to convince you this is a trusted message. Please be aware that your phone will group it with legitimate messages from Westpac.

The message advises confirmation of your latest login is required, and by clicking the link you will be taken to a fake sign in page (phishing website) which requests your personal banking information.

Westpac will never ask you for this type information via sms. Please delete this message.

 

 

May 2019

Description: This SMS advises your Internet Banking has been suspended, by clicking the link you will be taken to a fake sign in page (phishing website) which requests your personal banking information to unlock your account.

Westpac will never ask you for this type information via sms. Please delete this message.

 

March 2019

Description: This sophisticated SMS also contains a recipients first and last name, and has been sent using a sender name of "Westpac" to convince you this is a trusted message. Please be aware that your phone will group it with legitimate messages from Westpac.

The message advises your accounts are suspended, and by clicking the link you will be taken to a fake sign in page (phishing website) which requests your personal banking information.

Westpac will never ask you for this type information via sms. Please delete this message.

 

January 2019

Description: Scammers have used a sender name of "WestpacInfo" to lure you into clicking the link within the message. The message advises your accounts are blocked, and by clicking the link you will be taken to a fake sign in page (phishing website) which requests your personal banking information.

Westpac will never ask you for this type information via sms. Please delete this message.

December 2018

Description: Below are 3 copies of fake SMS messages targeting Westpac customers. Scammers try to lure you into clicking the link within the message by advising your banking or accounts are suspended. By clicking the link you will be taken to a fake sign in page (phishing website) which requests your personal and banking information.

Westpac will never ask you for this type information via sms. Please delete this message.




November 2018

Description: The SMS hoax message advises that we have identified some unusual activity in your online banking and to click the link provided to secure your account This link will take you to a fake sign in page (phishing site) that is targeted to obtain your personal information.

Please note this SMS has been sent using a sender name of "Westpac" and therefore may appear in legitimate SMS conversations from Westpac.

Westpac will never ask you for this type information via sms. Please delete this message.

 

SMS scam  November

 

October 2018

Description: The SMS hoax message advises your Westpac Online account has been suspended and to click the link to provide further verification information. This link will take you to a fake sign in page (phishing website) that is targeted to obtain your personal and banking information.

Westpac will never ask you for this type information via sms. Please delete this message.

 

SMS scam

 

Description: The SMS hoax message your card suspended due to irregular activities and to click the link to restore access. This link will take you to a fake sign in page (phishing website) that is targeted to obtain your personal and banking information.

Westpac will never ask you for this type information via sms. Please delete this message.

 

SMS scam

 

July 2018

Description: The SMS hoax message advises that your bank account has been suspended and to click the link to provide further verification information. This link will take you to a fake sign in page (phishing site) that is targeted to obtain your personal information.

Westpac will never ask you for this type information via sms. Please delete this message.

 

SMS scam

 

June 2018

Description: This SMS scam is designed to lure you into clicking the link within this message. By opening this link you may be taken to a phishing website, in an attempt to steal your online banking sign in details.

Westpac will never ask you for this type information via sms. Please delete this message.

 

SMS scam

Malicious software alerts

March 2019

Email Subject Line: Your Telstra Business Email Bill

This email entices you to open the attached link by advising you have a Telstra Bill due. It is highly your personal or banking information may be compromised if this link is clicked.

If you have clicked any links within this email we strongly recommend you install Trusteer Rapport, go to westpac.com.au/trusteer and contact us immediately.  

 

scam email


Email Subject Line:
Your new statement

This email entices you to open the attached link by advising one of two payable invoices is overdue. It is highly your personal or banking information may be compromised if this link is clicked.

If you have clicked any links within this email we strongly recommend you install Trusteer Rapport, go to westpac.com.au/trusteer and contact us immediately.  

 

scam email

 

January 2019

Email Subject Line: Reminder: Telstra TBS Documents

By clicking to view the attached document within this email posing as Telstra, there is a strong possibility your computer will become infected with malicious software, which will compromise your online activities, including your banking.

If you have clicked any links within this email we strongly recommend you install Trusteer Rapport, go to westpac.com.au/trusteer and contact us immediately.  

 

scam email

 

Email Subject Line: Your EnergyAustralia Electricity bill is here

By clicking any links to view your bill within this email posing as an EnergyAustralia bill, there is a strong possibility your computer will become infected with malicious software, which will compromise your online activities, including your banking. Amounts and due dates will vary for individual recipients.

If you have clicked any links within this email we strongly recommend you install Trusteer Rapport, go to westpac.com.au/trusteer and contact us immediately.  

 

ASIC scam email


October 2018

Email Subject Line: AGL electricity bill

By clicking any links in this email posing as AGL, there is a strong possibility your computer will become infected with malicious software, which will compromise your online activities, including your banking.

If you have clicked any links within this email we strongly recommend you install Trusteer Rapport, go to westpac.com.au/trusteer and contact us immediately.

 


March 2018

Email Subject Line: Please DocuSign the attached Business Activity Statements

By clicking the link in this scam email to review the attached document there is a strong possibility your computer will become infected with malicious software, which will compromise your online activities, including your banking

Do not click the link in this email or enter the information requested. If you have clicked any links within this email we strongly recommend you install Trusteer Rapport to your device, go to westpac.com.au/trusteer.

 


December 2017

Email Subject Line: Bill INV with reference number

By clicking the link or opening the invoice attached to this message there is a strong possibility your computer will be infected with malicious software, which will compromise your online activities, including your banking.


DO NOT click any links or open any attachments in this email. If you have clicked any links within this email we strongly recommend you install Trusteer Rapport to your device, go to westpac.com.au/trusteer